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Witches and Fairies and Shape-Shifting, Oh My!

Before Halloween passes us by, here are a few more Celtic tunes you might enjoy!

The Witches' HIll

This Scottish strathspey sound great on the harp and isn't too difficult to play. The first verse features a simple accompaniment; choose to play only this version if you are a lower intermediate player.  The second time through, I've added grace notes, rolled chords and some parallel passages, none of them too hard for solid intermediate players.

Song of the Pooka

I first fell in love with this haunting tune on a Noirinn ni Rainn recording years ago.  Once I discovered it's beautiful story, I knew I had to arrange it for harp.  It's a staple for performances and fits beautifully into a performance of Celtic mysteries.

This is a very old Irish tune, written by a fisherman and fiddler from the Northwest coast of Ireland, who, when out fishing with his mates one day, heard the tune mysteriously playing in the middle of the ocean. Believing it have an otherworldly origin, he named the tune after the, Pooka, an Irish water spirit.  Later speculation tied the tune to migrating humpback whales.  Either way, the tune is haunting.

The Song of Fionnuala

Fionnuala was the only girl in a family of boy, resented and ill-treated by their father's new wife.  The stepmother eventually turned the lot of them into swans.  I have set this tune with a left-hand that becomes almost a counter melody, with contrary and parallel motion.   Play it simply and beautifully. The text is by Thomas Moore.